Category Archives: I Love Museums

Sharing my loves of visiting museums

I Went Back to the National Museum of African American History & Culture Because Once Was Not Enough

BY: Eugenia PUBLISHED ON: Tuesday, April 4, 2017 IN: I Love Museums On the Road Again

My first visit to the new National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) in the nation’s capital was on December 21, 2016. I left the museum without experiencing all that the newest Smithsonian had to offer. One day was really not enough. So, I went back. This time with fourteen people ready to take in more of the National Museum of African American History and Culture.


NMAAHC

On my initial visit, the hubby and I explored our African American history and culture with our college friends.  This time, our entourage included my millennials from New York City, our fellow Paris travelers, and other family members.

NMAAHC

I Wnet Back to the National Museum of African American History & Culture Because Once Was Not Enough.  Wearing: J. Crew Classic Denim Jacket, Target Who What Wear  Black and White Stripe Crew similar here, J. Crew  Navy and White Sailor Wide-leg Pant similar chino pant here, Miu Miu Gold Heels similar here with Vogue Limited-Edition Clare V Folder Over Suede Clutch.

 

My main goal this time was to see the Emmett Till memorial, including his coffin. We weren’t allowed to take photos at the family’s request but it was well-worth the line to see it.  The last time I went to the NMAAHC, there were long lines with hours of wait time to see the restored coffin.  This time, there was no extended wait time for this exhibit.  As a Black woman, the senseless and brutalizing death of this fourteen-year-old Black child was most certainly a jumping off point in 1955 for the Civil Rights Movement.

I Went Back to the National Museum of African American History & Culture Because Once Was Not Enough. The segregated railroad car, the first artifact installed into the not completed National Museum of African American History and Culture.

NMAAHC

I Went Back to the National Museum of History and Culture Because Once Was Not Enough. A segregated railroad car of the Southern Railway Company was the first artifact installed into the National Museum of African American History and Culture on the weekend of November 15, 2013.

NMAAHC

I Went Back to the National Museum of African American History & Culture Because Once Was Not Enough. The restored Jim Crow-era segregated passenger train coach on display inside the National Museum of African American History & Culture in Washington D.C.

This time I was fascinated with the Southern Railway No. 1200 Jim Crow era train car inside the museum.  The segregated railroad car was the first artifact installed and the museum was built around it. According to The Official Guide to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture (which I bought in the bookstore), during the 1940s, the Southern Railway Company operated a long-distance passenger service between Washington, D.C., and New Orleans.  To comply with state laws that required public transportation be segregated, the company outfitted this coach with a partition to create separate seating sections for white and black passengers.

Reading The Official Guide to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture, reminded me that I still didn’t see everything located in the 85,000 square feet of exhibition space which houses over 3,000 objects.  

The NMAAHC is still experiencing record number visitors since opening in September 2016.  You still must have a timed pass to enter the museum.  I was able to secure another set of the free timed entry passes back on January 5th.  The next release for July 2017 passes is on April 5th at 9:00 a.m.  Passes go very quickly when released.

NMAAHC

I Went Back to the National Museum of African American History & Culture Because Once Was Not Enough. The millennials and the boomers.

I Went Back to the National Museum of African American of History & Culture Because Once Was Not Enough. Location: NMAAHC in Washington, D.C. My millennials: Arianna, my daughter, Channing, and Serena.

NMAAHC and National Museum of African American History & Culture

I Went Back to the National Museum of African American History & Culture Because Once Was Not Enough. Location: NMAAHC. BFF, Cynthia and I at the museum.

Our group of millennials and boomers opted to polish off our day with dinner at BusBoys and Poets, a restaurant, bookstore, lounge, and theater in the Northwest section of Washington, D.C instead of 
Sweet Home Café in the NMAAHC.

If you live in the Washington, D.C area, be sure to visit the National Museum of African American History & Culture.  But know that once is not enough to fully experience its wealth of exhibits. If not, I hope you enjoyed my visit this time.

Have a fabulous, fierce and stylish week,

I Discovered the Museum of the City of New York

BY: Eugenia PUBLISHED ON: Wednesday, February 8, 2017 IN: Family Matters I Love Museums On the Road Again

Did you know that New York City has a total of 83 museums among the five boroughs? I had the chance to discover one of them — the Museum of the City of New York.

For those of you who have been following the Age of Grace for the past four years, you know that I very much relish the chance to take a trip to any museum.  No matter the location, the Louvre in Paris,  the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, or the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D. C., I like them all. I’m already looking forward to the Metropolitan Museum of Arts Costume Institute’s, Spring 2017 Rei Kawakubo and Comme des Garçons exhibit.
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My First Visit to the National Museum of African American History and Culture

BY: Eugenia PUBLISHED ON: Tuesday, December 27, 2016 IN: I Love Museums On the Road Again

On September 24th, 2016, the 19th Smithsonian Museum opened its doors to the public. And finally, last week, I was able to visit the National African American Museum of History and Culture (NMAAHC).

My First Visit to the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Location: Italian Lake, Harrisburg, PA. Wearing: Vince Camuto Ruched Sequined Sheath Black Dress, ASOS Oversized Faux Fur Scarf in Chocolate similar here, Metallic Bronze Leather Gloves from Portolano Sample sale similar here, Metallic Heels from Mui Mui sample sale similar here, Chanel Quilted Mini from Fashionphile similar here.

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New York Calling

BY: Eugenia PUBLISHED ON: Monday, August 29, 2016 IN: I Love Museums On the Road Again Talking Fashion

Location: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Rooftop Garden, standing at British artist, Cornelia Parker's recreation from Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 film, Psycho.

Perhaps it my annual trips to New York City when I was a child with my grandmother and or with the private all-girl’s high school I attended but it seems that the city that never sleeps is always calling me back. This time to see latest curated exhibit at the Anna Wintour Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
New York Calling
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All That Jazz

BY: Eugenia PUBLISHED ON: Monday, April 11, 2016 IN: I Love Museums Smooth Jazz

All That Jazz
Earlier this year, when I visited the Jacqueline De Ribes exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, I ventured over to the special display Celebrating Sax Instruments and Innovation, where I learned about the Adolphe Sax. The rare saxophone collection reminded me of that jazz I enjoy.

All That Jazz

I really appreciate that when you go to see an exhibit at the New York City Metropolitan Museum of Art, you get some much for your donation. There is always an amazing amount of displays to see in just one day, you just have to be  brave enough to maneuver the crowds.
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One Stop

BY: Eugenia PUBLISHED ON: Wednesday, February 24, 2016 IN: I Love Museums On the Road Again Style Icons Talking Fashion

One Stop

When you live in Small Town, USA like I do, a trip to New York City is the ultimate one stop destination for style inspiration, great food, cultural enrichment, and of course, shopping.

One Stop

My hubby and I motored to New York City for a belated birthday celebration with our daughter, Channing, a fashion journalist.  Upon our arrival on Friday evening, we commenced the weekend’s festivities with a literary-themed dining experience at The Writing Room in her neighborhood.

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Looking East

BY: Eugenia PUBLISHED ON: Monday, September 7, 2015 IN: Fashion Is Art I Love Museums On the Road Again

Looking East

Standing in front of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC to attend the Costume Institute’s exhibit China: Through the Looking Glass.  Outfit: On repeat with J. Crew linen  chevron-striped dress, Mansur Gabriel black leather large tote with Fashionphile Chloé Aurore wallet on chain and Nine West heels.

In case you don’t recall at this year’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, the May 4 Costume Institute Benefit Gala, Rihanna was queen of China. I never paid attention to this red carpet event probably not until I started to attend the Costume Institute exhibits three years ago when my daughter moved to New York City. I say Rhianna was looking east for her fashion inspiration for this year’s Met Costume Ball’s Exhibit China:  Through the Looking Glass.

NEW YORK, NY - Guo Pei Gown. A view of atmosphere at "China: Through The Looking Glass" Costume Institute Benefit Gala - Press Preview at Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 4, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images)

NEW YORK, NY – An awe-inspiring Guo Pei gown embroidered with gold an silver silk is displayed amid ancient Buddha figurines. A view of atmosphere at “China: Through The Looking Glass” Costume Institute Benefit Gala – Press Preview at Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 4, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images)

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The Whitney

BY: Eugenia PUBLISHED ON: Wednesday, July 22, 2015 IN: I Love Museums On the Road Again

The Whitney
On my road trip last weekend to visit my daughter, we ventured to Manhattan’s Meatpacking District to see The Whitney.  As in The Whitney Museum of American Art, it is the world’s leading museum of twentieth-century and contemporary art of the United States. Founded by sculptor and arts patron Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney.

The WhitneyThe museum is brand spanking new at this location.  It opened May 1, 2015, now home to more than 19,000 works of modern and contemporary American Art.

The Whitney

The Whitney

In 1931, Whitney approached the famed Metropolitan Museum of Arts to house her twenty-year collection of 700 modern art works.  Upon rejection from The Met, it was then that she founded The Whitney Museum of American Art.

Wearing J. Crew punched-out eyelet dress, with Seychelles blue suede sandals and carrying Mansur Gavriel Black Flamma Tote. My collection of Tiffany charms, David Yurman cable bracelet, J. Crew Factor necklace with Prada sunnies.

On the rooftop of the Whitney Museum in NYC; Wearing J. Crew punched-out eyelet dress, with Seychelles blue suede “Play Along” heels, carrying Mansur Gavriel Black Flamma Tote. My collection of Tiffany charms, David Yurman cable buckle bracelet with gold, J. Crew Factor statement necklace with Prada sunnies.  The first photo you can see the Freedom Tower in the skyline.

Vanderbilt! You may recall the name from the prominent United States Vanderbilt family.  As in her daddy was Cornelius Vanderbilt II. Cornelius built his wealth in shipping and railroads during the Gilded Age. Just a reminder, the Gilded Age was an era of rapid economic growth in the United States’s industrialization.

This portrait of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney is featured in the first-floor gallery devoted to Gertrude in the Whitney Museum. Whitney commissioned this portrait in 1916 from Robert Henri, leader of the urban realist painters.

This portrait of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney is featured in the first-floor gallery devoted to Gertrude in the Whitney Museum. Whitney commissioned this portrait in 1916 from Robert Henri, leader of the urban realist painters.

Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (January 9,1875 – April 18,1942) was a prominent social figure and hostess who was born into the wealthy Vanderbilt family and married into the also prosperous Whitney family.

The building was designed by architect Renzo Piano, who also designed the New York Times Building, The inaugural exhibit, “America Is Hard to See,” is drawn entirely from the Whitney Museum of Art’s collection.  The massive collection covers most of the eight floors. The well-curated art is reflective of the period of time as listed below:

Floor Eight:  1910 -1940
Floor Seven:  1925 -1960
Floor Six:  1950 -1975
Floor Five:  1965 – Present
Floor Three: Susan and John Hess Family Gallery and Theater and Education Center and Laurie M. Tisch Education Center
Floor One: 1900-1935 The early history of the Whitney is examined

Some of my favorites pieces:

The Brooklyn Bridge: Variation on an Old Theme, 1939 by Joseph Stella (oil on canvas)

The Brooklyn Bridge: Variation on an Old Theme, 1939 by Joseph Stella (oil on canvas)

 

The Buffalo Hunt, 1933 by Horace Pippin (1888 - 1946) oil on canvas

The Buffalo Hunt, 1933 by Horace Pippin (1888 – 1946) oil on canvas

"Barack and Michelle" by Elizabeth Peyton.

“Barack and Michelle” by Elizabeth Peyton.

The exhibit runs until September 27, 2015. The admission fee is $22.00 per person. The museum offers Friday night pay-as-you-wish program from 7 to 10 pm like the Metropolitan Museum of Art offers everyday. Looking for a new and interesting place for a date, a fun day with the girls or art appreciation? The Whitney is the place.
Museum Hours:
Monday:  10:30 am – 6 pm
Tuesday – Closed
Wednesday:  10:30 am – 6 pm
Great accommodating hours for the latter part of the week – Thursday through Saturday when the museum hours are 10:30 am – 10:00 pm.
Non-flash photography is allowed however selfie-sticks and tripods are prohibited.

The Whitney

My daughter, the soon to be Mrs.Yazy and I enjoyed the eighth-floor rooftop Studio Cafe small-bites restaurant as did everyone else for the scenic skyline views. Our aerial visual enjoyment included the massive Google building, the tip of the Empire State Building on one side and the Freedom Tower on another side.

The title, " America Is Hard to See," comes from a poem by Robert Frost and a political documentary by Emile de Antonio.

The title, ” America Is Hard to See,” comes from a poem by Robert Frost and a political documentary by Emile de Antonio.

My trips to NYC aren’t complete until we do what’s become the new normal.  The girls and I spent a lovely neither rainy nor cloudy day walking to brunch at a little Italian restaurant on the upper east side, manicures at our fave Blooming Nails, taking the dreaded Metro downtown to the Whitney and finishing off the night with dinner in the Union Square area. With all this strolling, I was able to get in 14,000 steps in my flats that I brought along (the heels were just for my outfit photo).

I walked 6 miles with 14, 497 steps. My goal is at least 10,000 per day as monitored by my Fitbit App.

I walked 6 miles with 14, 497 steps. My goal is at least 10,000 per day as monitored by my Fitbit App.

Thumbs Up ?? for The Whitney Museum’s new location on the Hudson River and the well-curated “America Is Hard To See” exhibit. America is actually easy to see at The Whitney. If you are planning a visit to Manhattan be sure to include this stop.

A special thank you to my daughter Channing for my wonderful photos.

Have a fabulous week!

eugenia_siggy

 

It’s Monumental

BY: Eugenia PUBLISHED ON: Monday, July 6, 2015 IN: I Love Museums On the Road Again

It's Monumental

It’s Monumental! What? My recent trip to Washington, D. C.  All the classic sights that most people have explored over the years. The  monuments dedicated to people who made American history, you know them – The Washington Monument, The Lincoln Memorial, The Jefferson Memorial, The newest one, The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial to name a few.

Wearing: J. Crew Factory strapless knit dress, Stella and Dot necklace and All Hail Ceri Espadrille Slingbacks from Gilt.

Wearing: J. Crew Factory strapless knit dress, Stella and Dot necklace and All Hail Ceri Espadrille Slingbacks from Gilt.

The Extra Mile- Points of Light Volunteer Pathway is a national monument in Washington D.C. I am standing on one of the 34 bronze medallions honoring people who 'through their caring and personal sacrifice, reached out to others, building their owns dreams into movements that helped people across American and throughout the world".

Frederick Douglass’ Bronze Medallion – The Extra Mile- Points of Light Volunteer Pathway is a national monument in Washington D. C. I am standing on one of the 34 bronze medallions honoring people who ‘through their caring and personal sacrifice, reached out to others, building their owns dreams into movements that helped people across American and throughout the world”.

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